Dross: noun, something regarded as worthlessSynonyms: rubbish, junk, debris“Some of its best properties could be sold quickly, but the dross/2017-03-31">dross might take years to offload.”Source: "How Donald Trump should handle conflicts of interest" published in The Economist, Dyspeptic: adjective, Of or having indigestion or consequent irritability or depressionSynonyms: bad-tempered, short-tempered, irritable“Pity V.S. Cameron’s government was too posh, too cocky, too blithe about globalization’s merits, too metropolitan. Harding is more comfortable with facts; with classic English reticence, he buries his family’s responses in footnotes and summaries.”Source: "Vantage point" published in The Economist, Rue: verb, Bitterly regret (something one has done or allowed to happen)Synonyms: deplore, lament, bemoan“Meanwhile, Mr. Showalter will now have a long six months to rue his slavery to the save rule before his club plays another game.”Source: "Progressive managers are finding sweet relief by unshackling their closers" published in The Economist, Ruminate: verb, Think deeply about somethingSynonyms: contemplate, consider, mull over“Alfred Sauvy, the French thinker... was prone to worry that the first world would become 'a society of old people, living in old houses, ruminating about old ideas. There are 25 words per lesson. Create. published in The Economist, Lugubrious: adjective, Looking or sounding sad and dismalSynonyms: mournful, gloomy, sad“The lugubrious strains of 'Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now' waft across a sunny beach in Acapulco.”Source: "Girlfriend in a conga" published in The Economist, Maelstrom: noun, a situation or state of confused movement or violent turmoilSynonyms: turbulence, tumult, turmoil“The execution of its leaders, as much as the Easter Rising itself, triggered a maelstrom of events: a surge of anti-British rage...”Source: "A terrible problem is born" published in The Economist, Magnate: noun, a wealthy and influential businessman or businesswomanSynonyms: industrialist, tycoon, mogul“Several of America’s great industrialists built empires in Pittsburgh, including Andrew Carnegie, a steel magnate. Next to London, famously cosmopolitan cities like Paris and Berlin are actually rather homogeneous.”Source: "Britain’s unparalleled diversity is here to stay" published in The Economist, Iconoclast: noun, a person who attacks cherished beliefs or institutionsSynonyms: critic, skeptic, dissenter“He has overtaken Manuel Valls, the centre-left prime minister, as the left’s most outspoken iconoclast, and shown up the Socialist left as die-hard conservatives.”Source: "How France’s economy minister is trying to change the country" published in The Economist, Idyll: noun, an extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque episode or sceneSynonyms: perfect time, ideal time, honeymoon“That might just persuade them to forgive the scriptwriters for the unwelcome disruption to their rural idyll.”Source: "Violence in the shires" published in The Economist, Ignoble: adjective, not honorable in character or purposeSynonyms: dishonorable, unworthy, base“Moreover, by controlling the body he controlled the equally unruly mind, keeping it pure from 'ignoble strife'.”Source: "Raising the temple" published in The Economist, Impugn: verb, Dispute the truth, validity, or honesty of (a statement or motive)Synonyms: call into question, challenge“Impugning Mr. Abe’s motives is too cynical. “Source: "Taking a tumble" published in The Economist, Gaffe: noun, an unintentional act or remark causing embarrassment to its originatorSynonyms: blunder, mistake, error“Personally he is likeable. '”Source: "The Supreme Court considers what states owe to disabled students" published in The Economist, Sobriquet: noun, a person’s nicknameSynonyms: appellation, moniker“This provoked widespread debate about the role of intellectual property and earned him the sobriquet 'Champion of Patents. Log in Sign up. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want! Most common GRE vocabulary words | GRE vocabulary synonyms and antonyms pdf. Created by. Below you will find an ultimate list of high frequency words that appear on the GRE. “Source: "One can of worms, please. On the other hand, not knowing these GRE words … published in The Economist, Quell: verb, Suppress (a feeling, especially an unpleasant one)Synonyms: calm, soothe, pacify“So the correct response is to...plump up the capital cushions of its vulnerable banks with enough public money to quell fears of a systemic crisis.”Source: "The Italian job" published in The Economist, Quibble: verb, Argue or raise objections about a trivial matterSynonyms: object to, criticize, nitpick“One can quibble with some of the detail; perhaps the labour market participation rate can rise again, particularly if baby boomers find they don't have enough money with which to retire.”Source: "Nevsky’s prospects: China, fat tails and opaque markets" published in The Economist, Quotidian: adjective, Ordinary or everyday, especially when mundaneSynonyms: day-to-day, average, daily“They are seers, and mystics unfettered by the quotidian, connecting with the divine and reporting back.”Source: "The figure of the mad artistic genius is compelling, but unhelpful" published in The Economist, Recalcitrant: adjective, having an obstinately uncooperative attitude toward authoritySynonyms: uncooperative, intractable“In a move that may test the mettle of recalcitrant Senate Republicans, Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland, a widely respected and politically moderate judge...”Source: "Barack Obama nominates Merrick Garland to fill Antonin Scalia’s seat" published in The Economist, Recant: verb, Say that one no longer holds an opinion or beliefSynonyms: renounce, disavow, retract“Analysts who predict turmoil are warned to shut up or recant.”Source: "The muzzle grows tighter" published in The Economist, Salient: adjective, Most noticeable or importantSynonyms: conspicuous, noticeable, obvious“The reason for that emphasis may in part be because of the salient threat of terrorism…”Source: "The Democrats’ orchestral finale" published in The Economist, Sardonic: adjective, grimly mocking or cynicalSynonyms: satirical, sarcastic, ironic“Ms Jefferson, it must be said, is a master of the arched-eyebrow, sardonic quip.”Source: "A world apart" published in The Economist, Savant: noun, a learned person, especially a distinguished scientistSynonyms: intellectual, scholar, sage“The more a society treats its businesspeople as hero savants based on their professional successes, elevating them to positions of political power.”Source: "Let them die" published in The Economist, Soliloquy: noun, an act of speaking one’s thoughts aloud when by oneself, especially by a character in a playSynonyms: monologue, speech“Patrick Stewart, for instance, reworked Hamlet’s soliloquy as an ode to the letter B ('B or not a B, that is the question').”Source: "Big Bird, big brain" published in The Economist, Stipulate: verb, Demand or specify (a requirement), typically as part of a bargain or agreementSynonyms: set down, set out, lay down“In trade negotiations, size matters. Making Words Stick: Memorizing GRE Vocabulary Come up with Clever (and Wacky) Associations Use It or Lose It Do Not Bite Off More Than You Can Chew Read to Be Surprised Takeaways Most Common GRE Words Top 10 GRE Words of 2012 Top 5 Basic GRE Words Common Words that Students Always Get Wrong Tricky “Easy” GRE Words … 500 most used words in English Everyone loves a good list and here is one that English learners will find really useful: The 500 most used words in English . published in The Economist, Catalyst: noun, a person or thing that precipitates an eventSynonyms: stimulus, impetus, spark“Europe, which is where the global refugee regime began 65 years ago... will have to be the catalyst for change.”Source: "Looking for a home" published in The Economist, Catharsis: noun, the process of releasing and providing relief from strong or repressed emotionsSynonyms: emotional release, relief“...Robin Hanbury-Tenison, another British explorer, who is president of Survival International, calls 'the gosh factor'—that rush of amazement and catharsis when a pinnacle is reached or a mad exploit in some jungle or desert achieved...”Source: "A new age of discovery" published in The Economist, Cloture: noun, (in a legislative assembly) a procedure for ending a debate and taking a vote“'If you do not have the support of 60 Senators to invoke cloture and end a filibuster... you cannot pass such a deeming resolution in the Senate. published in The Economist, Bucolic: adjective, Relating to the pleasant aspects of the countryside and country lifeSynonyms: rustic, rural, pastoral“General Electric... is now swapping its bucolic site for a collection of warehouses on the Boston waterfront.”Source: "Leaving for the city" published in The Economist, Canonical: adjective, (Of an artist or work) belonging to the literary or artistic canonSynonyms: established, authoritative“The medium now mostly consists of recycling the same canonical works by European men from centuries past.”Source: "Can classical music be cool?" Try GRE Tutor FREE for 7 days with no commitment, Let us know if you're interested in our enterprise license program. Study 800 Most Frequent GRE Vocab Words Flashcards at ProProfs - These are the 800 most frequent and most difficult words found on the GRE as outlined by Barron's GRE Prep Guide. Over 500 of the Most Frequently Misspelled Words in the English Language (Continued) transferred tremendous trespass twelfth typical tyranny U unbelievable unconscious undesirable undoubtedly uneasiness unforgettable unmanageable unnecessary until useful usual V vacuum valleys valuable varieties vaudeville Write. Browse. Crudes can be viscous like tar or so 'light' they float on water.”Source: "Crude measure" published in The Economist, Volatile: adjective, Liable to change rapidly and unpredictably, especially for the worseSynonyms: tense, strained, turbulent“The period from the 1940s to the 1970s, when governments took primary responsibility for keeping economies out of slumps, was more volatile and inflationary...”Source: "The desperation of independents" published in The Economist, Waffle: noun, Lengthy but trivial or useless talk or writingSynonyms: prattle, hot air, drivel“Most voters say they know little about the candidates or their policies, some of which are pure waffle.”Source: "No walk in the Park" published in The Economist, Waft: verb, Pass or cause to pass easily or gently through or as if through the airSynonyms: drift, float, glide“The acrid scent of smoke wafts from his clothes.”Source: "Despite tough talk, Indonesia’s government is struggling to stem deforestation" published in The Economist, Wanton: adjective, (of a cruel or violent action) deliberate and unprovokedSynonyms: malicious, malevolent, spiteful“Over the decades these Muslim non-people, without legal or any other sort of protection, have been the victims of wanton discrimination and violence…”Source: "Myanmar’s shame" published in The Economist, Whitewash: verb, Deliberately attempt to conceal unpleasant facts about (a person or organization)Synonyms: cover up, sweep under the carpet“Indeed, in trying to whitewash the past, the government may stir up prejudice instead.”Source: "The politics of memory" published in The Economist, Whittle: verb, Reduce something in size, amount, or extent by a gradual series of stepsSynonyms: erode, wear away, diminish“Democrats had spent a nervous September watching that lead whittle away after Mrs. Clinton’s bout of pneumonia...”Source: "Hillary Clinton’s polling compared with Barack Obama’s" published in The Economist, Winsome: adjective, Attractive or appealing in appearance or characterSynonyms: engaging, charming, winning“By the time Mr. Pattinson came along as the winsome vampire in “Twilight”, the teenage rebels were starting the movie already dead.”Source: "James Dean, death-cult idol" published in The Economist, Wizened: adjective, Shriveled or wrinkled with ageSynonyms: lined, creased, withered“His son, himself a wizened old man, is nonplussed by the news; he looks like an eccentric, or maybe the village drunk...”Source: "The meandering, sure-footed genius of "Thithi" published in The Economist, Wry: adjective, Using or expressing dry, especially mocking, humorSynonyms: ironic, sardonic, satirical“Catherine Merridale is one of the foremost foreign historians of Russia, combining wry insights with deep sympathy for the human beings...”Source: "Missed connection" published in The Economist, Zeal: noun, Great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objectiveSynonyms: passion, zealousness, fervor“But it was his zeal in amassing land by borrowing heavily that gave him his edge—and ultimately brought him down.”Source: "A gambler on shale" published in The Economist, Abasement: noun, the action or fact of abasing or being abased; humiliation or degradationSynonyms: belittlement, disgrace“But of course, Europe needs more than humility or self-abasement if it is to absorb the migrants who are now sailing or trudging towards its heart.”Source: "A non-European pope is hailed as the greatest European" published in The Economist, Abate: verb, become less intense or widespreadSynonyms: subside, die away, die down“A broad cash crunch and broken supply chains threaten a sharp economic slowdown—albeit one that will abate...”Source: "The dire consequences of India’s demonetization initiative" published in The Economist, Accession: verb, the action or process of formally joining an association or institutionSynonyms: joining, signing up, enrollment“China had expected to win the status of a market economy in December, 15 years after its accession to the World Trade Organization...”Source: "An obsession with stable growth leads to vulnerabilities in China" published in The Economist, Acerbic: adjective, (Especially of a comment or style of speaking) sharp and forthrightSynonyms: sardonic, biting, caustic“Mr. Redshift Partition By Example, Trade Ideas Vs Vectorvest, Salzburger Nockerl Salzburg Dessert, Stouffers Spaghetti With Meat Sauce Instructions, Okay Pure Naturals African Black Soap Original Reviews, Alice Cullen Real Name, Rikdad Final Crisis, " />Dross: noun, something regarded as worthlessSynonyms: rubbish, junk, debris“Some of its best properties could be sold quickly, but the dross/2017-03-31">dross might take years to offload.”Source: "How Donald Trump should handle conflicts of interest" published in The Economist, Dyspeptic: adjective, Of or having indigestion or consequent irritability or depressionSynonyms: bad-tempered, short-tempered, irritable“Pity V.S. Cameron’s government was too posh, too cocky, too blithe about globalization’s merits, too metropolitan. Harding is more comfortable with facts; with classic English reticence, he buries his family’s responses in footnotes and summaries.”Source: "Vantage point" published in The Economist, Rue: verb, Bitterly regret (something one has done or allowed to happen)Synonyms: deplore, lament, bemoan“Meanwhile, Mr. Showalter will now have a long six months to rue his slavery to the save rule before his club plays another game.”Source: "Progressive managers are finding sweet relief by unshackling their closers" published in The Economist, Ruminate: verb, Think deeply about somethingSynonyms: contemplate, consider, mull over“Alfred Sauvy, the French thinker... was prone to worry that the first world would become 'a society of old people, living in old houses, ruminating about old ideas. There are 25 words per lesson. Create. published in The Economist, Lugubrious: adjective, Looking or sounding sad and dismalSynonyms: mournful, gloomy, sad“The lugubrious strains of 'Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now' waft across a sunny beach in Acapulco.”Source: "Girlfriend in a conga" published in The Economist, Maelstrom: noun, a situation or state of confused movement or violent turmoilSynonyms: turbulence, tumult, turmoil“The execution of its leaders, as much as the Easter Rising itself, triggered a maelstrom of events: a surge of anti-British rage...”Source: "A terrible problem is born" published in The Economist, Magnate: noun, a wealthy and influential businessman or businesswomanSynonyms: industrialist, tycoon, mogul“Several of America’s great industrialists built empires in Pittsburgh, including Andrew Carnegie, a steel magnate. Next to London, famously cosmopolitan cities like Paris and Berlin are actually rather homogeneous.”Source: "Britain’s unparalleled diversity is here to stay" published in The Economist, Iconoclast: noun, a person who attacks cherished beliefs or institutionsSynonyms: critic, skeptic, dissenter“He has overtaken Manuel Valls, the centre-left prime minister, as the left’s most outspoken iconoclast, and shown up the Socialist left as die-hard conservatives.”Source: "How France’s economy minister is trying to change the country" published in The Economist, Idyll: noun, an extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque episode or sceneSynonyms: perfect time, ideal time, honeymoon“That might just persuade them to forgive the scriptwriters for the unwelcome disruption to their rural idyll.”Source: "Violence in the shires" published in The Economist, Ignoble: adjective, not honorable in character or purposeSynonyms: dishonorable, unworthy, base“Moreover, by controlling the body he controlled the equally unruly mind, keeping it pure from 'ignoble strife'.”Source: "Raising the temple" published in The Economist, Impugn: verb, Dispute the truth, validity, or honesty of (a statement or motive)Synonyms: call into question, challenge“Impugning Mr. Abe’s motives is too cynical. “Source: "Taking a tumble" published in The Economist, Gaffe: noun, an unintentional act or remark causing embarrassment to its originatorSynonyms: blunder, mistake, error“Personally he is likeable. '”Source: "The Supreme Court considers what states owe to disabled students" published in The Economist, Sobriquet: noun, a person’s nicknameSynonyms: appellation, moniker“This provoked widespread debate about the role of intellectual property and earned him the sobriquet 'Champion of Patents. Log in Sign up. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want! Most common GRE vocabulary words | GRE vocabulary synonyms and antonyms pdf. Created by. Below you will find an ultimate list of high frequency words that appear on the GRE. “Source: "One can of worms, please. On the other hand, not knowing these GRE words … published in The Economist, Quell: verb, Suppress (a feeling, especially an unpleasant one)Synonyms: calm, soothe, pacify“So the correct response is to...plump up the capital cushions of its vulnerable banks with enough public money to quell fears of a systemic crisis.”Source: "The Italian job" published in The Economist, Quibble: verb, Argue or raise objections about a trivial matterSynonyms: object to, criticize, nitpick“One can quibble with some of the detail; perhaps the labour market participation rate can rise again, particularly if baby boomers find they don't have enough money with which to retire.”Source: "Nevsky’s prospects: China, fat tails and opaque markets" published in The Economist, Quotidian: adjective, Ordinary or everyday, especially when mundaneSynonyms: day-to-day, average, daily“They are seers, and mystics unfettered by the quotidian, connecting with the divine and reporting back.”Source: "The figure of the mad artistic genius is compelling, but unhelpful" published in The Economist, Recalcitrant: adjective, having an obstinately uncooperative attitude toward authoritySynonyms: uncooperative, intractable“In a move that may test the mettle of recalcitrant Senate Republicans, Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland, a widely respected and politically moderate judge...”Source: "Barack Obama nominates Merrick Garland to fill Antonin Scalia’s seat" published in The Economist, Recant: verb, Say that one no longer holds an opinion or beliefSynonyms: renounce, disavow, retract“Analysts who predict turmoil are warned to shut up or recant.”Source: "The muzzle grows tighter" published in The Economist, Salient: adjective, Most noticeable or importantSynonyms: conspicuous, noticeable, obvious“The reason for that emphasis may in part be because of the salient threat of terrorism…”Source: "The Democrats’ orchestral finale" published in The Economist, Sardonic: adjective, grimly mocking or cynicalSynonyms: satirical, sarcastic, ironic“Ms Jefferson, it must be said, is a master of the arched-eyebrow, sardonic quip.”Source: "A world apart" published in The Economist, Savant: noun, a learned person, especially a distinguished scientistSynonyms: intellectual, scholar, sage“The more a society treats its businesspeople as hero savants based on their professional successes, elevating them to positions of political power.”Source: "Let them die" published in The Economist, Soliloquy: noun, an act of speaking one’s thoughts aloud when by oneself, especially by a character in a playSynonyms: monologue, speech“Patrick Stewart, for instance, reworked Hamlet’s soliloquy as an ode to the letter B ('B or not a B, that is the question').”Source: "Big Bird, big brain" published in The Economist, Stipulate: verb, Demand or specify (a requirement), typically as part of a bargain or agreementSynonyms: set down, set out, lay down“In trade negotiations, size matters. Making Words Stick: Memorizing GRE Vocabulary Come up with Clever (and Wacky) Associations Use It or Lose It Do Not Bite Off More Than You Can Chew Read to Be Surprised Takeaways Most Common GRE Words Top 10 GRE Words of 2012 Top 5 Basic GRE Words Common Words that Students Always Get Wrong Tricky “Easy” GRE Words … 500 most used words in English Everyone loves a good list and here is one that English learners will find really useful: The 500 most used words in English . published in The Economist, Catalyst: noun, a person or thing that precipitates an eventSynonyms: stimulus, impetus, spark“Europe, which is where the global refugee regime began 65 years ago... will have to be the catalyst for change.”Source: "Looking for a home" published in The Economist, Catharsis: noun, the process of releasing and providing relief from strong or repressed emotionsSynonyms: emotional release, relief“...Robin Hanbury-Tenison, another British explorer, who is president of Survival International, calls 'the gosh factor'—that rush of amazement and catharsis when a pinnacle is reached or a mad exploit in some jungle or desert achieved...”Source: "A new age of discovery" published in The Economist, Cloture: noun, (in a legislative assembly) a procedure for ending a debate and taking a vote“'If you do not have the support of 60 Senators to invoke cloture and end a filibuster... you cannot pass such a deeming resolution in the Senate. published in The Economist, Bucolic: adjective, Relating to the pleasant aspects of the countryside and country lifeSynonyms: rustic, rural, pastoral“General Electric... is now swapping its bucolic site for a collection of warehouses on the Boston waterfront.”Source: "Leaving for the city" published in The Economist, Canonical: adjective, (Of an artist or work) belonging to the literary or artistic canonSynonyms: established, authoritative“The medium now mostly consists of recycling the same canonical works by European men from centuries past.”Source: "Can classical music be cool?" Try GRE Tutor FREE for 7 days with no commitment, Let us know if you're interested in our enterprise license program. Study 800 Most Frequent GRE Vocab Words Flashcards at ProProfs - These are the 800 most frequent and most difficult words found on the GRE as outlined by Barron's GRE Prep Guide. Over 500 of the Most Frequently Misspelled Words in the English Language (Continued) transferred tremendous trespass twelfth typical tyranny U unbelievable unconscious undesirable undoubtedly uneasiness unforgettable unmanageable unnecessary until useful usual V vacuum valleys valuable varieties vaudeville Write. Browse. Crudes can be viscous like tar or so 'light' they float on water.”Source: "Crude measure" published in The Economist, Volatile: adjective, Liable to change rapidly and unpredictably, especially for the worseSynonyms: tense, strained, turbulent“The period from the 1940s to the 1970s, when governments took primary responsibility for keeping economies out of slumps, was more volatile and inflationary...”Source: "The desperation of independents" published in The Economist, Waffle: noun, Lengthy but trivial or useless talk or writingSynonyms: prattle, hot air, drivel“Most voters say they know little about the candidates or their policies, some of which are pure waffle.”Source: "No walk in the Park" published in The Economist, Waft: verb, Pass or cause to pass easily or gently through or as if through the airSynonyms: drift, float, glide“The acrid scent of smoke wafts from his clothes.”Source: "Despite tough talk, Indonesia’s government is struggling to stem deforestation" published in The Economist, Wanton: adjective, (of a cruel or violent action) deliberate and unprovokedSynonyms: malicious, malevolent, spiteful“Over the decades these Muslim non-people, without legal or any other sort of protection, have been the victims of wanton discrimination and violence…”Source: "Myanmar’s shame" published in The Economist, Whitewash: verb, Deliberately attempt to conceal unpleasant facts about (a person or organization)Synonyms: cover up, sweep under the carpet“Indeed, in trying to whitewash the past, the government may stir up prejudice instead.”Source: "The politics of memory" published in The Economist, Whittle: verb, Reduce something in size, amount, or extent by a gradual series of stepsSynonyms: erode, wear away, diminish“Democrats had spent a nervous September watching that lead whittle away after Mrs. Clinton’s bout of pneumonia...”Source: "Hillary Clinton’s polling compared with Barack Obama’s" published in The Economist, Winsome: adjective, Attractive or appealing in appearance or characterSynonyms: engaging, charming, winning“By the time Mr. Pattinson came along as the winsome vampire in “Twilight”, the teenage rebels were starting the movie already dead.”Source: "James Dean, death-cult idol" published in The Economist, Wizened: adjective, Shriveled or wrinkled with ageSynonyms: lined, creased, withered“His son, himself a wizened old man, is nonplussed by the news; he looks like an eccentric, or maybe the village drunk...”Source: "The meandering, sure-footed genius of "Thithi" published in The Economist, Wry: adjective, Using or expressing dry, especially mocking, humorSynonyms: ironic, sardonic, satirical“Catherine Merridale is one of the foremost foreign historians of Russia, combining wry insights with deep sympathy for the human beings...”Source: "Missed connection" published in The Economist, Zeal: noun, Great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objectiveSynonyms: passion, zealousness, fervor“But it was his zeal in amassing land by borrowing heavily that gave him his edge—and ultimately brought him down.”Source: "A gambler on shale" published in The Economist, Abasement: noun, the action or fact of abasing or being abased; humiliation or degradationSynonyms: belittlement, disgrace“But of course, Europe needs more than humility or self-abasement if it is to absorb the migrants who are now sailing or trudging towards its heart.”Source: "A non-European pope is hailed as the greatest European" published in The Economist, Abate: verb, become less intense or widespreadSynonyms: subside, die away, die down“A broad cash crunch and broken supply chains threaten a sharp economic slowdown—albeit one that will abate...”Source: "The dire consequences of India’s demonetization initiative" published in The Economist, Accession: verb, the action or process of formally joining an association or institutionSynonyms: joining, signing up, enrollment“China had expected to win the status of a market economy in December, 15 years after its accession to the World Trade Organization...”Source: "An obsession with stable growth leads to vulnerabilities in China" published in The Economist, Acerbic: adjective, (Especially of a comment or style of speaking) sharp and forthrightSynonyms: sardonic, biting, caustic“Mr. Redshift Partition By Example, Trade Ideas Vs Vectorvest, Salzburger Nockerl Salzburg Dessert, Stouffers Spaghetti With Meat Sauce Instructions, Okay Pure Naturals African Black Soap Original Reviews, Alice Cullen Real Name, Rikdad Final Crisis, " />Dross: noun, something regarded as worthlessSynonyms: rubbish, junk, debris“Some of its best properties could be sold quickly, but the dross/2017-03-31">dross might take years to offload.”Source: "How Donald Trump should handle conflicts of interest" published in The Economist, Dyspeptic: adjective, Of or having indigestion or consequent irritability or depressionSynonyms: bad-tempered, short-tempered, irritable“Pity V.S. Cameron’s government was too posh, too cocky, too blithe about globalization’s merits, too metropolitan. Harding is more comfortable with facts; with classic English reticence, he buries his family’s responses in footnotes and summaries.”Source: "Vantage point" published in The Economist, Rue: verb, Bitterly regret (something one has done or allowed to happen)Synonyms: deplore, lament, bemoan“Meanwhile, Mr. Showalter will now have a long six months to rue his slavery to the save rule before his club plays another game.”Source: "Progressive managers are finding sweet relief by unshackling their closers" published in The Economist, Ruminate: verb, Think deeply about somethingSynonyms: contemplate, consider, mull over“Alfred Sauvy, the French thinker... was prone to worry that the first world would become 'a society of old people, living in old houses, ruminating about old ideas. There are 25 words per lesson. Create. published in The Economist, Lugubrious: adjective, Looking or sounding sad and dismalSynonyms: mournful, gloomy, sad“The lugubrious strains of 'Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now' waft across a sunny beach in Acapulco.”Source: "Girlfriend in a conga" published in The Economist, Maelstrom: noun, a situation or state of confused movement or violent turmoilSynonyms: turbulence, tumult, turmoil“The execution of its leaders, as much as the Easter Rising itself, triggered a maelstrom of events: a surge of anti-British rage...”Source: "A terrible problem is born" published in The Economist, Magnate: noun, a wealthy and influential businessman or businesswomanSynonyms: industrialist, tycoon, mogul“Several of America’s great industrialists built empires in Pittsburgh, including Andrew Carnegie, a steel magnate. Next to London, famously cosmopolitan cities like Paris and Berlin are actually rather homogeneous.”Source: "Britain’s unparalleled diversity is here to stay" published in The Economist, Iconoclast: noun, a person who attacks cherished beliefs or institutionsSynonyms: critic, skeptic, dissenter“He has overtaken Manuel Valls, the centre-left prime minister, as the left’s most outspoken iconoclast, and shown up the Socialist left as die-hard conservatives.”Source: "How France’s economy minister is trying to change the country" published in The Economist, Idyll: noun, an extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque episode or sceneSynonyms: perfect time, ideal time, honeymoon“That might just persuade them to forgive the scriptwriters for the unwelcome disruption to their rural idyll.”Source: "Violence in the shires" published in The Economist, Ignoble: adjective, not honorable in character or purposeSynonyms: dishonorable, unworthy, base“Moreover, by controlling the body he controlled the equally unruly mind, keeping it pure from 'ignoble strife'.”Source: "Raising the temple" published in The Economist, Impugn: verb, Dispute the truth, validity, or honesty of (a statement or motive)Synonyms: call into question, challenge“Impugning Mr. Abe’s motives is too cynical. “Source: "Taking a tumble" published in The Economist, Gaffe: noun, an unintentional act or remark causing embarrassment to its originatorSynonyms: blunder, mistake, error“Personally he is likeable. '”Source: "The Supreme Court considers what states owe to disabled students" published in The Economist, Sobriquet: noun, a person’s nicknameSynonyms: appellation, moniker“This provoked widespread debate about the role of intellectual property and earned him the sobriquet 'Champion of Patents. Log in Sign up. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want! Most common GRE vocabulary words | GRE vocabulary synonyms and antonyms pdf. Created by. Below you will find an ultimate list of high frequency words that appear on the GRE. “Source: "One can of worms, please. On the other hand, not knowing these GRE words … published in The Economist, Quell: verb, Suppress (a feeling, especially an unpleasant one)Synonyms: calm, soothe, pacify“So the correct response is to...plump up the capital cushions of its vulnerable banks with enough public money to quell fears of a systemic crisis.”Source: "The Italian job" published in The Economist, Quibble: verb, Argue or raise objections about a trivial matterSynonyms: object to, criticize, nitpick“One can quibble with some of the detail; perhaps the labour market participation rate can rise again, particularly if baby boomers find they don't have enough money with which to retire.”Source: "Nevsky’s prospects: China, fat tails and opaque markets" published in The Economist, Quotidian: adjective, Ordinary or everyday, especially when mundaneSynonyms: day-to-day, average, daily“They are seers, and mystics unfettered by the quotidian, connecting with the divine and reporting back.”Source: "The figure of the mad artistic genius is compelling, but unhelpful" published in The Economist, Recalcitrant: adjective, having an obstinately uncooperative attitude toward authoritySynonyms: uncooperative, intractable“In a move that may test the mettle of recalcitrant Senate Republicans, Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland, a widely respected and politically moderate judge...”Source: "Barack Obama nominates Merrick Garland to fill Antonin Scalia’s seat" published in The Economist, Recant: verb, Say that one no longer holds an opinion or beliefSynonyms: renounce, disavow, retract“Analysts who predict turmoil are warned to shut up or recant.”Source: "The muzzle grows tighter" published in The Economist, Salient: adjective, Most noticeable or importantSynonyms: conspicuous, noticeable, obvious“The reason for that emphasis may in part be because of the salient threat of terrorism…”Source: "The Democrats’ orchestral finale" published in The Economist, Sardonic: adjective, grimly mocking or cynicalSynonyms: satirical, sarcastic, ironic“Ms Jefferson, it must be said, is a master of the arched-eyebrow, sardonic quip.”Source: "A world apart" published in The Economist, Savant: noun, a learned person, especially a distinguished scientistSynonyms: intellectual, scholar, sage“The more a society treats its businesspeople as hero savants based on their professional successes, elevating them to positions of political power.”Source: "Let them die" published in The Economist, Soliloquy: noun, an act of speaking one’s thoughts aloud when by oneself, especially by a character in a playSynonyms: monologue, speech“Patrick Stewart, for instance, reworked Hamlet’s soliloquy as an ode to the letter B ('B or not a B, that is the question').”Source: "Big Bird, big brain" published in The Economist, Stipulate: verb, Demand or specify (a requirement), typically as part of a bargain or agreementSynonyms: set down, set out, lay down“In trade negotiations, size matters. Making Words Stick: Memorizing GRE Vocabulary Come up with Clever (and Wacky) Associations Use It or Lose It Do Not Bite Off More Than You Can Chew Read to Be Surprised Takeaways Most Common GRE Words Top 10 GRE Words of 2012 Top 5 Basic GRE Words Common Words that Students Always Get Wrong Tricky “Easy” GRE Words … 500 most used words in English Everyone loves a good list and here is one that English learners will find really useful: The 500 most used words in English . published in The Economist, Catalyst: noun, a person or thing that precipitates an eventSynonyms: stimulus, impetus, spark“Europe, which is where the global refugee regime began 65 years ago... will have to be the catalyst for change.”Source: "Looking for a home" published in The Economist, Catharsis: noun, the process of releasing and providing relief from strong or repressed emotionsSynonyms: emotional release, relief“...Robin Hanbury-Tenison, another British explorer, who is president of Survival International, calls 'the gosh factor'—that rush of amazement and catharsis when a pinnacle is reached or a mad exploit in some jungle or desert achieved...”Source: "A new age of discovery" published in The Economist, Cloture: noun, (in a legislative assembly) a procedure for ending a debate and taking a vote“'If you do not have the support of 60 Senators to invoke cloture and end a filibuster... you cannot pass such a deeming resolution in the Senate. published in The Economist, Bucolic: adjective, Relating to the pleasant aspects of the countryside and country lifeSynonyms: rustic, rural, pastoral“General Electric... is now swapping its bucolic site for a collection of warehouses on the Boston waterfront.”Source: "Leaving for the city" published in The Economist, Canonical: adjective, (Of an artist or work) belonging to the literary or artistic canonSynonyms: established, authoritative“The medium now mostly consists of recycling the same canonical works by European men from centuries past.”Source: "Can classical music be cool?" Try GRE Tutor FREE for 7 days with no commitment, Let us know if you're interested in our enterprise license program. Study 800 Most Frequent GRE Vocab Words Flashcards at ProProfs - These are the 800 most frequent and most difficult words found on the GRE as outlined by Barron's GRE Prep Guide. Over 500 of the Most Frequently Misspelled Words in the English Language (Continued) transferred tremendous trespass twelfth typical tyranny U unbelievable unconscious undesirable undoubtedly uneasiness unforgettable unmanageable unnecessary until useful usual V vacuum valleys valuable varieties vaudeville Write. Browse. Crudes can be viscous like tar or so 'light' they float on water.”Source: "Crude measure" published in The Economist, Volatile: adjective, Liable to change rapidly and unpredictably, especially for the worseSynonyms: tense, strained, turbulent“The period from the 1940s to the 1970s, when governments took primary responsibility for keeping economies out of slumps, was more volatile and inflationary...”Source: "The desperation of independents" published in The Economist, Waffle: noun, Lengthy but trivial or useless talk or writingSynonyms: prattle, hot air, drivel“Most voters say they know little about the candidates or their policies, some of which are pure waffle.”Source: "No walk in the Park" published in The Economist, Waft: verb, Pass or cause to pass easily or gently through or as if through the airSynonyms: drift, float, glide“The acrid scent of smoke wafts from his clothes.”Source: "Despite tough talk, Indonesia’s government is struggling to stem deforestation" published in The Economist, Wanton: adjective, (of a cruel or violent action) deliberate and unprovokedSynonyms: malicious, malevolent, spiteful“Over the decades these Muslim non-people, without legal or any other sort of protection, have been the victims of wanton discrimination and violence…”Source: "Myanmar’s shame" published in The Economist, Whitewash: verb, Deliberately attempt to conceal unpleasant facts about (a person or organization)Synonyms: cover up, sweep under the carpet“Indeed, in trying to whitewash the past, the government may stir up prejudice instead.”Source: "The politics of memory" published in The Economist, Whittle: verb, Reduce something in size, amount, or extent by a gradual series of stepsSynonyms: erode, wear away, diminish“Democrats had spent a nervous September watching that lead whittle away after Mrs. Clinton’s bout of pneumonia...”Source: "Hillary Clinton’s polling compared with Barack Obama’s" published in The Economist, Winsome: adjective, Attractive or appealing in appearance or characterSynonyms: engaging, charming, winning“By the time Mr. Pattinson came along as the winsome vampire in “Twilight”, the teenage rebels were starting the movie already dead.”Source: "James Dean, death-cult idol" published in The Economist, Wizened: adjective, Shriveled or wrinkled with ageSynonyms: lined, creased, withered“His son, himself a wizened old man, is nonplussed by the news; he looks like an eccentric, or maybe the village drunk...”Source: "The meandering, sure-footed genius of "Thithi" published in The Economist, Wry: adjective, Using or expressing dry, especially mocking, humorSynonyms: ironic, sardonic, satirical“Catherine Merridale is one of the foremost foreign historians of Russia, combining wry insights with deep sympathy for the human beings...”Source: "Missed connection" published in The Economist, Zeal: noun, Great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objectiveSynonyms: passion, zealousness, fervor“But it was his zeal in amassing land by borrowing heavily that gave him his edge—and ultimately brought him down.”Source: "A gambler on shale" published in The Economist, Abasement: noun, the action or fact of abasing or being abased; humiliation or degradationSynonyms: belittlement, disgrace“But of course, Europe needs more than humility or self-abasement if it is to absorb the migrants who are now sailing or trudging towards its heart.”Source: "A non-European pope is hailed as the greatest European" published in The Economist, Abate: verb, become less intense or widespreadSynonyms: subside, die away, die down“A broad cash crunch and broken supply chains threaten a sharp economic slowdown—albeit one that will abate...”Source: "The dire consequences of India’s demonetization initiative" published in The Economist, Accession: verb, the action or process of formally joining an association or institutionSynonyms: joining, signing up, enrollment“China had expected to win the status of a market economy in December, 15 years after its accession to the World Trade Organization...”Source: "An obsession with stable growth leads to vulnerabilities in China" published in The Economist, Acerbic: adjective, (Especially of a comment or style of speaking) sharp and forthrightSynonyms: sardonic, biting, caustic“Mr. Redshift Partition By Example, Trade Ideas Vs Vectorvest, Salzburger Nockerl Salzburg Dessert, Stouffers Spaghetti With Meat Sauce Instructions, Okay Pure Naturals African Black Soap Original Reviews, Alice Cullen Real Name, Rikdad Final Crisis, " />
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In tone, it was indeed, and I should have noted that.”Source: "The etymological fallacy" published in The Economist, Faction: noun, a small, organized, dissenting group within a larger one, especially in politicsSynonyms: contingent, section, sector“One particular separatist faction is now widely accepted to have been responsible for a string of small bombs which detonated in August...”Source: "The death of the Thai king throws the country into turmoil" published in The Economist, Fallow: adjective, InactiveSynonyms: dormant, quiet, slack“Their fickle attention might waver for a few fallow years of rebuilding, but Angel Stadium will still be standing...”Source: "Why baseball’s best player should be sent packing" published in The Economist, Falter: verb, Move unsteadily or in a way that shows lack of confidenceSynonyms: stumble, fumble“His early steps were faltering, and a frailer soul might have been daunted by his mentors’ fate...”Source: "Obituary: John Glenn died on December 8th" published in The Economist, Flail: verb, Flounder; struggle uselesslySynonyms: thrash, thresh, squirm“This means that, a good accent, rhythm and grammar notwithstanding, the intermediate-to-advanced learner is likely to flail...”Source: "The humble linguist" published in The Economist, Fluke: noun, Unlikely chance occurrence, especially a surprising piece of luckSynonyms: coincidence, accident, a twist of fate“Was this a fluke? On average, he released a studio album every year...”Source: "Everything flowed through Prince" published in The Economist, Proxy: noun, a person authorized to act on behalf of anotherSynonyms: representative, substitute, stand-in“...Mr. Thaksin’s sister Yingluck, who took over his political movement after he left the country and who in 2011 was elected prime minister as his proxy.”Source: "The death of the Thai king throws the country into turmoil: Chris Christie and Carly Fiorina drop out" published in The Economist, Prudish: adjective, having a tendency to be easily shocked by matters relating to sex or nuditySynonyms: puritanical, prim, goody-goody“Several Pacific nations ban cross-dressing (another hand-me-down from prudish Victorians).”Source: "Knife-edge lives" published in The Economist, Qualm: noun, an uneasy feeling of doubt, worry, or fearSynonyms: misgiving, doubt, reservation“Qualms about the force’s quality extend beyond their handling of demonstrators.”Source: "The force is with who?" Others are sanguine that people will have time to adapt.”Source: "Retraining low-skilled workers" published in The Economist, Scintilla: noun, a tiny trace or spark of a specified quality or feelingSynonyms: particle, iota, smidgen“After a scintilla of regret over lost youth, to turn 50 should be to enter the prime of life, with a plenitude of projects and achievements.”Source: "Time for a (long overdue) change" published in The Economist, Semantic: adjective, Relating to meaning in language or logicSynonyms: lingual, semasiological“Semantic parsing also ensued over whether the modifier 'meaningful' is significantly (or meaningfully) different from 'significant. Flashcards. '”Source: "Why the Senate hasn't passed a budget" published in The Economist, Compendium: noun, a collection of concise but detailed information about a particular subjectSynonyms: compilation, anthology“He relies on a crowdsourced compendium of fishermen’s tales.”Source: "Wiki-fishing" published in The Economist, Conscript: verb, Enlist (someone) compulsorilySynonyms: draft, recruit, call up“Most Jewish Israelis are conscripted into the military; about 100,000 new recruits, fresh out of secondary school, are drafted each year...”Source: "Tales from Silicon wadi" published in The Economist, Cosset: verb, Care for and protect in an overindulgent waySynonyms: indulge, pander to“With a big haul, Scotland’s politicians could perhaps afford to cosset oil firms. It's free and takes five seconds. If you want to expand your selection, try following Economist GRE Tutor on Instagram or downloading our GRE Daily Vocabulary app, for a new word every day. [ RELATED: GRE Vocabulary – Using Root Words] Key Takeaways: Learning GRE Vocab Words. 500 of the most common vocabulary words that appear on the GRE General Revised Test. Silver delighted in savaging commentators who relied on vapid clichés like 'momentum shifts' and 'game-changers. The first step is to look through our list and identify all the words you aren’t 100% … Boehner, having abandoned his long battle with his party’s truculent right-wingers and announced his resignation in September, wanted to ‘clear the barn’ for his successor.”Source: "Cleaning the barn" published in The Economist, Turgid: adjective, (of language or style) tediously pompous or bombasticSynonyms: overblown, inflated, grandiose“It promotes a cult of personality around Mr. Baghdadi. word; how; said; an; each; she; which; do; their; time; if; will; way; about; many; then; them; would; write; like; so; these; her; long; make; thing; see; him; two; has; look; more; day; could; go; come; did; my; sound; no; most; number; who; over; know; water; than; call; first; people; may; down; side; been; now; find; any; new; work; … This structure prevents the confusion that results when you try to learn lots of words beginning with the same letter. It's free and takes five seconds. The most common GRE vocabulary words are rare but reasonable.The vocab questions don’t test the simplest GRE Vocabulary words, like cat or go.They also don’t test the hardest GRE Vocabulary words, like conodont or acnestis.The words tested on the GRE fall between these two extremes. Cotton presented himself as a member of the generation moved by the patriotic spirit... leaving civilian careers to join the army and learn a ‘warrior ethos.’”Source: "Growing Cotton in Iowa" published in The Economist, Facetious: adjective, Treating serious issues with deliberately inappropriate humorSynonyms: flippant, glib, tongue-in-cheek“'More disturbing,' says Mr. Hart, I didn't note that his column was facetious. published in The Economist, Pallid: adjective, (of a person's face) pale, typically because of poor healthSynonyms: white, pasty, wan“Its protagonists (played by the suitably pallid and slender Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton) are named Adam and Eve.”Source: "Nonfatal attraction" published in The Economist, Panache: noun, Flamboyant confidence of style or mannerSynonyms: self-assurance, style, flair“Second, a quick mind: he wrote with speed and panache, after strolling round leisurely with a big cigar beforehand.”Source: "The Fab One" published in The Economist, Paragon: noun, a person or thing regarded as a perfect example of a particular qualitySynonyms: model, epitome, exemplar“Despite the reasons to see it as a paragon of modernity, Odebrecht has long been accused of winning business in an old-fashioned and less admirable way.”Source: "Principles and values" published in The Economist, Parry: verb, Answer (a question or accusation) evasivelySynonyms: evade, sidestep, avoid“In the course of his business career, the president-elect has shown a remarkable ability to dodge and parry and reverse himself on everything...”Source: "How the Supreme Court will change under President Trump" published in The Economist, Penchant: noun, A strong or habitual liking for something or tendency to do somethingSynonyms: fondness, inclination, preference“Mr. in list order from A to Z from Z to A from easy to hard from hard to easy. '”Source: "Pandering and other sins" published in The Economist, Gambit: noun, a device, action, or opening remark, typically one entailing a degree of risk, that is calculated to gain an advantageSynonyms: plan, scheme, strategy“What began as a gambit to hold together his divided Tory party is turning into an alarmingly close contest.”Source: "The real danger of Brexit" published in The Economist, Goad: verb, Provoke or annoy (someone) so as to stimulate some action or reactionSynonyms: spur, prod, egg on“Her words were meant to goad officials into action, not (presumably) to describe how she saw the coming four years of her term.”Source: "A series of unfortunate events" published in The Economist, Gouge: verb, Overcharge; swindle“They do not want monopolists to gouge consumers and stifle innovation, yet they often struggle to determine the extent to which such things are happening.”Source: "It’s complicated" published in The Economist, Grandiloquent: adjective, Pompous or extravagant in language, style, or mannerSynonyms: pompous, bombastic, magniloquent“The authors give it a rather grandiloquent name: the desire 'to force destiny, to create serendipity. The words in each list are arranged in 10 easy-to-learn groups. '”Source: "How assisted suicide is gradually becoming lawful in America" published in The Economist, Coalesce: verb, Come together and form one mass or wholeSynonyms: merge, unite, fuse“As they radiate away, the waves tend to coalesce to form two main shock waves.”Source: "How supersonic jets may become less noisy" published in The Economist, Coffer: noun, the funds or financial reserves of a group or institutionSynonyms: resources, money, finances“This scheme drains public coffers and is horribly corrupt.”Source: "State of denial" published in The Economist, Condone: verb, Accept and allow (behavior that is considered morally wrong or offensive)Synonyms: disregard, let pass, excuse“Rashad Ali... argues that deradicalisation can be worse than useless if practitioners, while condemning IS, condone other violence.”Source: "A disarming approach" published in The Economist, Contrite: adjective, Feeling or expressing remorse or penitenceSynonyms: regretful, sorry, apologetic“As the election results were coming in, a contrite Mr. Turnbull took 'full responsibility' for the government’s poor performance.”Source: "The churn down under" published in The Economist, Credulous: adjective, having or showing too great a readiness to believe thingsSynonyms: gullible, naive“Supplements boast a unique trifecta: lax regulation, potent marketing and millions of credulousconsumers keen to pin their hopes of a healthier life on a pill.”Source: "Miracle healers" published in The Economist, Demur: verb, Raise doubts or objections or show reluctanceSynonyms: object, take exception, take issue“Mr. 151-175. The words in each list are divided into groups with similar meanings. Didactic. They are also largely diurnal and rely upon sight as their primary sense.”Source: "Fairy creatures" published in The Economist, dross/2017-03-31">Dross: noun, something regarded as worthlessSynonyms: rubbish, junk, debris“Some of its best properties could be sold quickly, but the dross/2017-03-31">dross might take years to offload.”Source: "How Donald Trump should handle conflicts of interest" published in The Economist, Dyspeptic: adjective, Of or having indigestion or consequent irritability or depressionSynonyms: bad-tempered, short-tempered, irritable“Pity V.S. Cameron’s government was too posh, too cocky, too blithe about globalization’s merits, too metropolitan. Harding is more comfortable with facts; with classic English reticence, he buries his family’s responses in footnotes and summaries.”Source: "Vantage point" published in The Economist, Rue: verb, Bitterly regret (something one has done or allowed to happen)Synonyms: deplore, lament, bemoan“Meanwhile, Mr. Showalter will now have a long six months to rue his slavery to the save rule before his club plays another game.”Source: "Progressive managers are finding sweet relief by unshackling their closers" published in The Economist, Ruminate: verb, Think deeply about somethingSynonyms: contemplate, consider, mull over“Alfred Sauvy, the French thinker... was prone to worry that the first world would become 'a society of old people, living in old houses, ruminating about old ideas. There are 25 words per lesson. Create. published in The Economist, Lugubrious: adjective, Looking or sounding sad and dismalSynonyms: mournful, gloomy, sad“The lugubrious strains of 'Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now' waft across a sunny beach in Acapulco.”Source: "Girlfriend in a conga" published in The Economist, Maelstrom: noun, a situation or state of confused movement or violent turmoilSynonyms: turbulence, tumult, turmoil“The execution of its leaders, as much as the Easter Rising itself, triggered a maelstrom of events: a surge of anti-British rage...”Source: "A terrible problem is born" published in The Economist, Magnate: noun, a wealthy and influential businessman or businesswomanSynonyms: industrialist, tycoon, mogul“Several of America’s great industrialists built empires in Pittsburgh, including Andrew Carnegie, a steel magnate. Next to London, famously cosmopolitan cities like Paris and Berlin are actually rather homogeneous.”Source: "Britain’s unparalleled diversity is here to stay" published in The Economist, Iconoclast: noun, a person who attacks cherished beliefs or institutionsSynonyms: critic, skeptic, dissenter“He has overtaken Manuel Valls, the centre-left prime minister, as the left’s most outspoken iconoclast, and shown up the Socialist left as die-hard conservatives.”Source: "How France’s economy minister is trying to change the country" published in The Economist, Idyll: noun, an extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque episode or sceneSynonyms: perfect time, ideal time, honeymoon“That might just persuade them to forgive the scriptwriters for the unwelcome disruption to their rural idyll.”Source: "Violence in the shires" published in The Economist, Ignoble: adjective, not honorable in character or purposeSynonyms: dishonorable, unworthy, base“Moreover, by controlling the body he controlled the equally unruly mind, keeping it pure from 'ignoble strife'.”Source: "Raising the temple" published in The Economist, Impugn: verb, Dispute the truth, validity, or honesty of (a statement or motive)Synonyms: call into question, challenge“Impugning Mr. Abe’s motives is too cynical. “Source: "Taking a tumble" published in The Economist, Gaffe: noun, an unintentional act or remark causing embarrassment to its originatorSynonyms: blunder, mistake, error“Personally he is likeable. '”Source: "The Supreme Court considers what states owe to disabled students" published in The Economist, Sobriquet: noun, a person’s nicknameSynonyms: appellation, moniker“This provoked widespread debate about the role of intellectual property and earned him the sobriquet 'Champion of Patents. Log in Sign up. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want! Most common GRE vocabulary words | GRE vocabulary synonyms and antonyms pdf. Created by. Below you will find an ultimate list of high frequency words that appear on the GRE. “Source: "One can of worms, please. On the other hand, not knowing these GRE words … published in The Economist, Quell: verb, Suppress (a feeling, especially an unpleasant one)Synonyms: calm, soothe, pacify“So the correct response is to...plump up the capital cushions of its vulnerable banks with enough public money to quell fears of a systemic crisis.”Source: "The Italian job" published in The Economist, Quibble: verb, Argue or raise objections about a trivial matterSynonyms: object to, criticize, nitpick“One can quibble with some of the detail; perhaps the labour market participation rate can rise again, particularly if baby boomers find they don't have enough money with which to retire.”Source: "Nevsky’s prospects: China, fat tails and opaque markets" published in The Economist, Quotidian: adjective, Ordinary or everyday, especially when mundaneSynonyms: day-to-day, average, daily“They are seers, and mystics unfettered by the quotidian, connecting with the divine and reporting back.”Source: "The figure of the mad artistic genius is compelling, but unhelpful" published in The Economist, Recalcitrant: adjective, having an obstinately uncooperative attitude toward authoritySynonyms: uncooperative, intractable“In a move that may test the mettle of recalcitrant Senate Republicans, Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland, a widely respected and politically moderate judge...”Source: "Barack Obama nominates Merrick Garland to fill Antonin Scalia’s seat" published in The Economist, Recant: verb, Say that one no longer holds an opinion or beliefSynonyms: renounce, disavow, retract“Analysts who predict turmoil are warned to shut up or recant.”Source: "The muzzle grows tighter" published in The Economist, Salient: adjective, Most noticeable or importantSynonyms: conspicuous, noticeable, obvious“The reason for that emphasis may in part be because of the salient threat of terrorism…”Source: "The Democrats’ orchestral finale" published in The Economist, Sardonic: adjective, grimly mocking or cynicalSynonyms: satirical, sarcastic, ironic“Ms Jefferson, it must be said, is a master of the arched-eyebrow, sardonic quip.”Source: "A world apart" published in The Economist, Savant: noun, a learned person, especially a distinguished scientistSynonyms: intellectual, scholar, sage“The more a society treats its businesspeople as hero savants based on their professional successes, elevating them to positions of political power.”Source: "Let them die" published in The Economist, Soliloquy: noun, an act of speaking one’s thoughts aloud when by oneself, especially by a character in a playSynonyms: monologue, speech“Patrick Stewart, for instance, reworked Hamlet’s soliloquy as an ode to the letter B ('B or not a B, that is the question').”Source: "Big Bird, big brain" published in The Economist, Stipulate: verb, Demand or specify (a requirement), typically as part of a bargain or agreementSynonyms: set down, set out, lay down“In trade negotiations, size matters. Making Words Stick: Memorizing GRE Vocabulary Come up with Clever (and Wacky) Associations Use It or Lose It Do Not Bite Off More Than You Can Chew Read to Be Surprised Takeaways Most Common GRE Words Top 10 GRE Words of 2012 Top 5 Basic GRE Words Common Words that Students Always Get Wrong Tricky “Easy” GRE Words … 500 most used words in English Everyone loves a good list and here is one that English learners will find really useful: The 500 most used words in English . published in The Economist, Catalyst: noun, a person or thing that precipitates an eventSynonyms: stimulus, impetus, spark“Europe, which is where the global refugee regime began 65 years ago... will have to be the catalyst for change.”Source: "Looking for a home" published in The Economist, Catharsis: noun, the process of releasing and providing relief from strong or repressed emotionsSynonyms: emotional release, relief“...Robin Hanbury-Tenison, another British explorer, who is president of Survival International, calls 'the gosh factor'—that rush of amazement and catharsis when a pinnacle is reached or a mad exploit in some jungle or desert achieved...”Source: "A new age of discovery" published in The Economist, Cloture: noun, (in a legislative assembly) a procedure for ending a debate and taking a vote“'If you do not have the support of 60 Senators to invoke cloture and end a filibuster... you cannot pass such a deeming resolution in the Senate. published in The Economist, Bucolic: adjective, Relating to the pleasant aspects of the countryside and country lifeSynonyms: rustic, rural, pastoral“General Electric... is now swapping its bucolic site for a collection of warehouses on the Boston waterfront.”Source: "Leaving for the city" published in The Economist, Canonical: adjective, (Of an artist or work) belonging to the literary or artistic canonSynonyms: established, authoritative“The medium now mostly consists of recycling the same canonical works by European men from centuries past.”Source: "Can classical music be cool?" Try GRE Tutor FREE for 7 days with no commitment, Let us know if you're interested in our enterprise license program. Study 800 Most Frequent GRE Vocab Words Flashcards at ProProfs - These are the 800 most frequent and most difficult words found on the GRE as outlined by Barron's GRE Prep Guide. Over 500 of the Most Frequently Misspelled Words in the English Language (Continued) transferred tremendous trespass twelfth typical tyranny U unbelievable unconscious undesirable undoubtedly uneasiness unforgettable unmanageable unnecessary until useful usual V vacuum valleys valuable varieties vaudeville Write. Browse. Crudes can be viscous like tar or so 'light' they float on water.”Source: "Crude measure" published in The Economist, Volatile: adjective, Liable to change rapidly and unpredictably, especially for the worseSynonyms: tense, strained, turbulent“The period from the 1940s to the 1970s, when governments took primary responsibility for keeping economies out of slumps, was more volatile and inflationary...”Source: "The desperation of independents" published in The Economist, Waffle: noun, Lengthy but trivial or useless talk or writingSynonyms: prattle, hot air, drivel“Most voters say they know little about the candidates or their policies, some of which are pure waffle.”Source: "No walk in the Park" published in The Economist, Waft: verb, Pass or cause to pass easily or gently through or as if through the airSynonyms: drift, float, glide“The acrid scent of smoke wafts from his clothes.”Source: "Despite tough talk, Indonesia’s government is struggling to stem deforestation" published in The Economist, Wanton: adjective, (of a cruel or violent action) deliberate and unprovokedSynonyms: malicious, malevolent, spiteful“Over the decades these Muslim non-people, without legal or any other sort of protection, have been the victims of wanton discrimination and violence…”Source: "Myanmar’s shame" published in The Economist, Whitewash: verb, Deliberately attempt to conceal unpleasant facts about (a person or organization)Synonyms: cover up, sweep under the carpet“Indeed, in trying to whitewash the past, the government may stir up prejudice instead.”Source: "The politics of memory" published in The Economist, Whittle: verb, Reduce something in size, amount, or extent by a gradual series of stepsSynonyms: erode, wear away, diminish“Democrats had spent a nervous September watching that lead whittle away after Mrs. Clinton’s bout of pneumonia...”Source: "Hillary Clinton’s polling compared with Barack Obama’s" published in The Economist, Winsome: adjective, Attractive or appealing in appearance or characterSynonyms: engaging, charming, winning“By the time Mr. Pattinson came along as the winsome vampire in “Twilight”, the teenage rebels were starting the movie already dead.”Source: "James Dean, death-cult idol" published in The Economist, Wizened: adjective, Shriveled or wrinkled with ageSynonyms: lined, creased, withered“His son, himself a wizened old man, is nonplussed by the news; he looks like an eccentric, or maybe the village drunk...”Source: "The meandering, sure-footed genius of "Thithi" published in The Economist, Wry: adjective, Using or expressing dry, especially mocking, humorSynonyms: ironic, sardonic, satirical“Catherine Merridale is one of the foremost foreign historians of Russia, combining wry insights with deep sympathy for the human beings...”Source: "Missed connection" published in The Economist, Zeal: noun, Great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objectiveSynonyms: passion, zealousness, fervor“But it was his zeal in amassing land by borrowing heavily that gave him his edge—and ultimately brought him down.”Source: "A gambler on shale" published in The Economist, Abasement: noun, the action or fact of abasing or being abased; humiliation or degradationSynonyms: belittlement, disgrace“But of course, Europe needs more than humility or self-abasement if it is to absorb the migrants who are now sailing or trudging towards its heart.”Source: "A non-European pope is hailed as the greatest European" published in The Economist, Abate: verb, become less intense or widespreadSynonyms: subside, die away, die down“A broad cash crunch and broken supply chains threaten a sharp economic slowdown—albeit one that will abate...”Source: "The dire consequences of India’s demonetization initiative" published in The Economist, Accession: verb, the action or process of formally joining an association or institutionSynonyms: joining, signing up, enrollment“China had expected to win the status of a market economy in December, 15 years after its accession to the World Trade Organization...”Source: "An obsession with stable growth leads to vulnerabilities in China" published in The Economist, Acerbic: adjective, (Especially of a comment or style of speaking) sharp and forthrightSynonyms: sardonic, biting, caustic“Mr.

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